Pest Control - Bees

 

 

 

 

Bee Control

Dealing with Bee's in Poole Bournemouth Dorset

Honey & Bumble Bees, Facts & Types

Bees, although one of the most popular bees, represent only a small percent of bee species. Honey bees are the only surviving group of bees from the Apini tribe, which is under the Apis genus. They are known for producing and storing honey, or liquefied sugar, as well as building impressively large nests using wax secreted by workers in a particular colony. 

The honey bee is one member of the insect class Insecta. These insects are members of the subfamily Apinae, which produce and store liquefied sugar, otherwise known as honey.

How To Identify A Honey Bee

Honey bees measure about 15 mm long and are light brown in colour. Honey bees are usually oval-shaped creatures with golden-yellow colours and brown bands. Although the body colour of honey bees varies between species and some honey bees have predominantly black bodies, almost all honey bees have varying dark-to-light striations. These light and dark stripes serve a purpose for the survival of the honey bee: unlike other species that hide when they sense predators close by, the brightly coloured bodies of the honey bee act as a warning to predators or honey robbers of the honey bees’ ability to sting.

Anatomy

The body of the honey bee is segmented: stinger, legs, antenna, three segments of thorax and six visible segments of abdomen. 

The head of the honey bee consists of the eyes, antennae and feeding structures. The eyes include the compound eye and the simple eye: the compound eye helps bees understand colour, light and directional information from the sun’s UV rays, while the function of the simple eye, also called ocelli, helps in determining the amount of light present. The antennas’ function is to smell and detect odours and to measure flight speed. The mandible is the bee’s jaw, which is used in eating pollen, cutting and shaping wax, feeding larvae and the queen, cleaning the hive, grooming and fighting. 

The thorax of the bee consists of the wings, legs and the muscles that control their movement. The forewing, which is typically larger than the hind wing, is used for flight and as a cooling mechanism, while the latter is used to fan away heat and cool the hive. 

Lastly, the abdomen’s six segments include female reproductive organs in the queen, male reproductive organs in the drone and the stinger in both workers and queen.

Behaviour

In the wild, honey bee hives are often located in the holes of trees and on rock crevices. The hive is made from wax from the special abdominal glands of worker honey bees. Workers sweep up a few flakes of wax from their abdomens and chew these flakes until the wax becomes soft. Workers then mold the wax and use it in making cells to form the hive. Unlike other bee species, honey bees do not hibernate during cold periods. Instead, they remain inside the nests huddled closely together, sharing body heat and feeding on stored food supplies.

Bee Control

Dealing with Bee's in Poole Bournemouth Dorset

Honey & Bumble Bees, Facts & Types

Bees, although one of the most popular bees, represent only a small percent of bee species. Honey bees are the only surviving group of bees from the Apini tribe, which is under the Apis genus. They are known for producing and storing honey, or liquefied sugar, as well as building impressively large nests using wax secreted by workers in a particular colony. 

The honey bee is one member of the insect class Insecta. These insects are members of the subfamily Apinae, which produce and store liquefied sugar, otherwise known as honey.

How To Identify A Honey Bee

Honey bees measure about 15 mm long and are light brown in colour. Honey bees are usually oval-shaped creatures with golden-yellow colours and brown bands. Although the body colour of honey bees varies between species and some honey bees have predominantly black bodies, almost all honey bees have varying dark-to-light striations. These light and dark stripes serve a purpose for the survival of the honey bee: unlike other species that hide when they sense predators close by, the brightly coloured bodies of the honey bee act as a warning to predators or honey robbers of the honey bees’ ability to sting.

Anatomy

The body of the honey bee is segmented: stinger, legs, antenna, three segments of thorax and six visible segments of abdomen. 

The head of the honey bee consists of the eyes, antennae and feeding structures. The eyes include the compound eye and the simple eye: the compound eye helps bees understand colour, light and directional information from the sun’s UV rays, while the function of the simple eye, also called ocelli, helps in determining the amount of light present. The antennas’ function is to smell and detect odours and to measure flight speed. The mandible is the bee’s jaw, which is used in eating pollen, cutting and shaping wax, feeding larvae and the queen, cleaning the hive, grooming and fighting. 

The thorax of the bee consists of the wings, legs and the muscles that control their movement. The forewing, which is typically larger than the hind wing, is used for flight and as a cooling mechanism, while the latter is used to fan away heat and cool the hive. 

Lastly, the abdomen’s six segments include female reproductive organs in the queen, male reproductive organs in the drone and the stinger in both workers and queen.

Behaviour

In the wild, honey bee hives are often located in the holes of trees and on rock crevices. The hive is made from wax from the special abdominal glands of worker honey bees. Workers sweep up a few flakes of wax from their abdomens and chew these flakes until the wax becomes soft. Workers then mold the wax and use it in making cells to form the hive. Unlike other bee species, honey bees do not hibernate during cold periods. Instead, they remain inside the nests huddled closely together, sharing body heat and feeding on stored food supplies.

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Honey bees are social creatures and live in colonies. However, they do display some aggressive behaviour within colonies: drones are ejected from their nests during cold weather, and a queen will sometimes sting other queens during mating fights for dominance. Although honey bees serve a significant role in pollination and ecology, measures should be taken to ensure that hives do not exist in close proximity to your home, due to the possibility of getting stung.

What Pest Detective Does

If Bees are present and they can be easily removed from your premises then it is always advised to contact a Bee Keeper whom are normally happy to take them away. However on some occasions it is not possible and we will ensure the appropriate actions are taken to ensure the safety of the customer.

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Poole: Branksome, Broadstone, Canford Cliffs, Sandbanks,, Charminster, ,Hamworthy, Oakdale, Upton, Westborne, Canford Heath, Parkstone, Penhill, Lytchett Minster, West Parley, West Moors, and Wimborne.

Bournemouth: Ashley Heath, Boscombe, Charminster, Moordown, Kinson, Kings Park, Queens Park, Winton, Ferndown , Southbourne, Meyrick Park, Pokestown, Mudeford ,Verwood, West Parley, West Moors and Highcliffe.

Blandford: Child Oakford, Milton Abbas, Sturminster Marshall, Sturminster Newton, Hazelbury Bryan, Marnhull, Tarrent Hinton, Milborne St Andrew, Witchampton and Wimborne.

Wareham & Swanage: Purbecks, Bere Regis, Bindon Abbey, Corfe castle, Worth Matravers, Moredon and Wool.

Ringwood: West Hampshire, Bransgore, Burley, Fordingbridge, Highcliffe and New Milton.

Dorset: Poole, Bournemouth, Christchurch, Wareham, Swanage, Purbecks, Wimborne, Blandford, Ringwood, Dorchester and Weymouth..

Dorchester & Weymouth: Abbotsbury, Puddletown, Upwey, Portland and Warmwell.

 

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